In this last group of episodes, we bid a final farewell to the world of old. After a blistering series of weeks, Europeans went from apathetic to wholly involved in current affairs. Britain was a great example of this - no clearer expression of apathy towards the ongoing crisis than in the British Isles. Suddenly, this all changed. Don't forget to check out my book to understand more fully exactly why! By the end of a short few days, the world was forever changed, and thus our narrative reaches its end.

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July Crisis Project #24: No One Can Stop (1 August 1914)

How did we get here and why don't we stop should have been the questions European statesmen asked themselves on 1st August 1914. Instead to them the peace was already lost, and all that remained was to jump into the abyss.

The meticulously laid plans for the Central Powers, and Germany in particular, necessitated that she strike France before an invasion of Russia could be affected. This rigid plan would result in a catastrophic foreign policy, as Germany was welded to the false impressions of its destiny.

The meticulously laid plans for the Central Powers, and Germany in particular, necessitated that she strike France before an invasion of Russia could be affected. This rigid plan would result in a catastrophic foreign policy, as Germany was welded to the false impressions of its destiny.

July Crisis Project #25: The Turn of Britain (2 August 1914)

How did Grey persuade Britain towards intervention? Or had he really done the job by the end of the day? The time was coming near for Britain to decide its stance.

Paul Cambon was the French ambassador to Britain, and the constant pressure source which pushed him to fulfill the commitments he had made, mostly unbeknownst to his peers.

Paul Cambon was the French ambassador to Britain, and the constant pressure source which pushed him to fulfill the commitments he had made, mostly unbeknownst to his peers.

July Crisis Project #26: Still In The Dark (3 August 1914)

Sir Edward Grey was delivering his speech to a packed meeting in the House of Commons, in which he hoped to bring British opinion around to intervention. Meanwhile, Germany was declaring war on France, and preparing to move against Belgium.

Grey's speech to the House of Commons on 3 August 1914 was chock full of representations to Britain's allies and the unraveling situation on the continent. It was also chock full of lies; Grey was in fact a minority among the British people and the government, and only very recently did the government decide to intervene. This was mostly thanks to the Belgian issue, which would be learned of only later in the evening of 3rd August, but until then the interventionists were reeling in spite of Grey's appeal.

Grey's speech to the House of Commons on 3 August 1914 was chock full of representations to Britain's allies and the unraveling situation on the continent. It was also chock full of lies; Grey was in fact a minority among the British people and the government, and only very recently did the government decide to intervene. This was mostly thanks to the Belgian issue, which would be learned of only later in the evening of 3rd August, but until then the interventionists were reeling in spite of Grey's appeal.

July Crisis Project #27: The Last Ultimatum (4 August 1914)

How would Britain finally react to the news of what Germany had done? The same way everyone else had reacted to everything in the past week of course! With one last ultimatum, Grey fulfilled the promises he had made to the French people, and the deception of the historical record was complete. 

Britain's entry into the war was greeted with jubilation in some parts, and divided the nation in other places. The statesmen of the day would remember it as a great sacrifice, but we should view it as nothing less than a terrible, unnecessary tragedy.

Britain's entry into the war was greeted with jubilation in some parts, and divided the nation in other places. The statesmen of the day would remember it as a great sacrifice, but we should view it as nothing less than a terrible, unnecessary tragedy.

July Crisis Project #28: Epilogue

The results of the mess of the July Crisis was worse than anyone could have imagined, as the war acquired its own aura and the events that preceded it were left behind and forgotten.

With the War underway, the media would come to play a towering role in shaping the population of the world.

With the War underway, the media would come to play a towering role in shaping the population of the world.

July Crisis Project #29: Conclusion

Bringing this story to an end in a satisfying manner is never easy, but we do our best here. What have I learned since I last examined the war's outbreak, and can we really blame anyone for what happened? Find out here

From the rooms and halls of privileged men, came scenes out of a horror film. Their tempers, paranoia, sense of honour and belief in their allies had all led to this moment. For the rest of human existence would their actions be scrutinised, as historians and the common man would ask themselves - why? Hopefully, you feel we've gone some way towards answering this question.

From the rooms and halls of privileged men, came scenes out of a horror film. Their tempers, paranoia, sense of honour and belief in their allies had all led to this moment. For the rest of human existence would their actions be scrutinised, as historians and the common man would ask themselves - why? Hopefully, you feel we've gone some way towards answering this question.

WDF Let's TALK

I'm not a particularly serious guy, so I always relish the chance to talk about recent podcasts with a more self-depreciating tone. Sean and I sit down for a fun conversation about the July Crisis, how it went for me and if it really was that hard after all (it was!). Sean presents an interesting competition, and we officially wrap up the era in our usual style. We hope you like it!